Tag Archives: explore

The seaside mayan ruins of Tulum

Imagine yourself immersed in the warm turquoise carribean water less than two hours after landing in Cancun, Mexico.  Just a little further south from the overrun beach town Playa del Carmen, Tulum offers a more laid back feel and is quieter and still has enough bars offering you your happy drinks during the happy hours.

Tulum is known for its seaside mayan ruins standing on the cliffs overlooking the ocean, just next to the beaches which makes it an ideal combination for many a visitor.
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Sera Monastery Tibet

Sera monastery  is one of the ‘great three’ Gelukpa (the lineage of the Dalai lama) monastic universities of Tibet, located just north of Lhasa. The other two are Ganden and Drepung monasteries.

The origin of the name ‘Sera’ is attributed to the fact that the site where the monastery was built was surrounded by wild roses  in bloom.  (se ra in Tibetan language)

During the 1959 revolt in Lhasa, Sera monastery suffered severe damage, with its colleges destroyed and hundreds of monks killed by the Chinese invader. Sera was one of the strongest pockets of resistance against the Chinese. After the Dalai Lama took asylum in India, many of the monks of the Sera monastery who survived the attack moved to Bylakuppe in Mysore, India.

The Sera monastery in Tibet and its counterpart in India are known for their energetic monk debates on the Buddha’s teachings. Sera monastery developed over the centuries as a renowned place of learning, training hundreds of scholars, many of whom have attained fame in the Buddhist nations.

Tibet, Lhasa, 20060703 Debatterende monniken in het Sera klooster bij Lhasa

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 The above image is available on a variety of high quality metal and paper prints in Stino Select

Some of the other images are part of the gallery Tibet & China and can be ordered as well.

 

King Bhumibol: staying forever young

King Bhumibol of Thailand is with 68 years on the throne the world’s longest reigning monarch.

He ascended as king following the death by gunshot of his  brother, King Ananda Mahidol, on 9 June 1946, under circumstances that remain unclear.

Bhumibol, in Sanskrit  meaning ‘strength of the land, incomparable power’ has always been immensely popular among most of the Thai people and pretty much enjoys the status of a God.

being 86 now he spends his old days at Klai Kangwon Palace – which translates as “far from worries palace” – in the seaside town of Hua Hin.  And even though the political situation in Thailand is  very worrisome at the moment the elderly man is held in the highest esteem among any of the warring parties.

In the streets of Thailand he remains forever young being portrayed in his eternal youth sometimes even with a camera around his neck acknowledging his lifelong passion for photography.

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Even though King Bhumibol is not seen in public very often anymore, the following images are very recent and give a more accurate depiction of the monarch.

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The British comedian  John Oliver has been denied access to Thailand after joking around too much recently with the current state of affairs in the monarchy, a few fragments very much worth watching